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    Billy Sheehan

    To highlight VG’s “Pop ’N Hiss” feature on the ’80 classic “Eat ’Em and Smile” by David Lee Roth, Billy Sheehan offered to give a guided tour of the famed “Wife” bass he used on the album. He also digs into the Yamaha BB3000 he used on that tour and for Roth’s next album. Read the piece in the January issue. READ NOW!!


    Popa Chubby

    Popa Chubby and his famed ’66 Fender Strat/’65 Princeton Reverb (with an Eminence Lil Buddy) team up to play “Angel On My Shoulder” from his new best-of, “Prime Cuts.” His wicked tone is built with help from a Wampler Faux Tape Echo V2, a TC Electronic Vortex Flanger, Maxxon OD808, J. Rockett Archer Ikon boost, and a Dunlop Cry Baby Mini. Read our interview with Popa in the January issue. READ NOW!!


    Intended to be the masterpiece of a titan in guitar-amp design, Music Man amps of the mid/late ’70s are all too easily mistaken for copies or wannabes chasing a market leader. Far from it, however, this flagship model really is the final evolution in a sonic goal Leo Fender had been working toward for three

    Roger Mello of SeaGlass Guitars officially opened shop in 2011. Today, he offers four electric models; his Route6jr maintains the simplicity of the guitars that inspired it while re-creating their classic features in a high-end, handcrafted solidbody. The Route6jr’s set-neck, lightweight design will feel familiar to those fond of a Les Paul Special and/or Junior,

    FENDER BANDMASTER 5E7

    Fender 5E7 Bandmaster

    Preamp tubes: one 12AY7, two 12AX7 Output tubes: two 6L6s, fixed biased Rectifier: 5U4G tube Controls: Volume, Volume, Treble, Bass, Presence Output: 28 watts RMS +/- Speaker: three 10″ Jensen P10R Two decades ago, when renewed appreciation of Fender’s narrow-panel tweed amps of the late ’50s really started to boom, the Bassman was generally considered

    Jay Geils

    Blues and Archtop

    If you grew up listening to music in the ’70s, you probably associate the name J. Geils with a five-piece band that played raucous rock and roll to hip-shaking partiers. Led by guitarist John “Jay” Geils, the group toured the world and recorded more than a dozen albums, selling millions through the early ’80s. Originally

    Star Board: Carl Verheyen

    In each issue of “Signal Chain,” we’ll take a guided tour of pro players’ pedalboards. We’re calling the feature “Star Board,” and we kick it off in this issue with a look at two of Carl Verheyen’s most-used pedal setups. Carl Verheyen’s “Pedalboard #1” Verheyen’s primary pedalboard for stage use has traveled the world with him.

    Michael Wilton

    Michael Wilton

    Rebuilding the Queensrÿche Brand

    The highly publicized firing of singer Geoff Tate from the band Queensrÿche has divided fans and spawned two touring bands using the name; Tate assembled a group of well-known sidemen, while the remaining members recruited frontman Todd La Torre. Guitarist Michael Wilton’s version of Queensrÿche recently released a self-titled album that marks a return to

    Jon Kammerer Guitars’ Pegasus

    Jon Kammerer Guitars’ Pegasus

    This Horse Has Wings

    Jon Kammerer Guitars’ Pegasus Price: $2,300 (list) Contact: www.jonkammerercustoms.com Anyone who has ever plugged an acoustic guitar into an amp or PA is well-acquainted with the bone-crushing howl of hollowbody feedback. It’s not a happy sound. And in a live setting, it can be almost impossible to dial in enough volume to sit in the

    Steve Cropper

    An MGs/Rascals Soul Summit

    Before they were called Booker T. & The MGs, the first song the house band for Memphis’ Stax label cut on their own was the instrumental “Green Onions” – which went to number one on the R&B chart and number three on Pop in 1963. Since then, Tele man Steve Cropper has become perhaps the

    Jim Lauderdale

    This Changes Everything

    From the beginning, four-time Grammy winner Jim Lauderdale’s masterful body of material has reflected a gifted vocalist/writer infused with country and roots music traditions. His previous effort, Soul Searching, explored the sounds of Memphis and Nashville. With Texas his focus this time, he’s backed by A-list Lone Star sidemen including producer-guitarist Tommy Detamore and guitarists

    Roland’s Blues Cube Artist

    Roland’s Blues Cube Artist

    Roland’s Blues Cube Artist Price: $1,169 (list)/$899 (street) Contact: www.rolandus.com Roland has reinvented and relaunched its Blues Cube combos with a series featuring Roland’s exclusive Tube Logic design that carefully emulates the preamp and poweramp tube responses of classic tube amps. One of these, the Blues Cube Artist, features a classic old-school appearance – cream-colored

    Etched in Time

    “Signature” Gibsons from the Early Days of Cable

    In 1984, Christian Roebling went from being just another guy watching TV to creating what was likely the first television program to focus on and feature guitar players and builders. Though few outside of New York City knew of its existence, in its six years on the air, “The Guitar Show” played host to some

    Marshall Amplifiers

    From Birth to the 21st Century

    From the first JTM to models for Clapton and Townshend, Jim Marshall has been building amps since the early 1960s. Though inspired by others, his amps are entities unto themselves. Marshall amplifiers have remained the choice of artists who wanted their sound to be as impressive as their look.

    The Vox AC30C2X and AC15C1

    Brit-Rock Mojo in a Box

    Fully appointed in classic Vox dress, the famed British amp maker’s new AC30C2X and AC15C1 both sport enough of that beloved AC30 look to make most any player yearn for Beatles boots and Fab Four suits. The AC30C2X is a 30-watt, 2×12 combo loaded with Celestion Alnico Blue speakers (there’s another version of this amp

    Jim Marshall

    Father of the Mighty Marshall Stack

    When it comes to guitar amplifiers, two names stand tall beyond the others: Leo Fender and Jim Marshall. Even “civilians” recognize these names. Two names, from two different countries, with two very individual sounds. Although Marshall’s original amplifier designs were largely influenced by Fender’s original Bassman, the resulting amplifier later took on a whole new

    Les Paul Remembered

    Les Paul Remembered

    When news of the passing of Les Paul spread through the guitar community August 13, 2009, reaction was swift and heartfelt. Claimed by complications of severe pneumonia at a hospital in White Plain, New York, Paul was 94. His name is synonymous with Gibson’s early solidbody electric guitars, and for a time he was one

    Ronnie Baker Brooks

    Times Have Changed

    Second-generation bluesman Ronnie Baker Brooks’ first album in 10 years blends the soul of Chicago, hot guitar licks, and old-school Memphis R&B. Produced by Steve Jordan and recorded at Royal Studios in Memphis and Blackbird Studio in Nashville, this disc shows Brooks at his most soulful. As a self-described bridge between the past and the

    Mark Sebastian

    Mark Sebastian

    Hometown Noir

    Mark Sebastian’s new album, The Real Story, is a paean to his musical roots in the Big Apple. “About a year ago, I realized I had almost an album’s worth of new songs, and wanted to record them,” he said. “I’d been playing the Living Room, here in New York City, (and) my vocal and

    Brimstone Audio Crossover Distortion XD-1

    Bi-Amping in a Box

    Brimstone Audio Crossover Distortion XD-1 Price: $299.95 Info: www.Brimstoneaudio.com. Brimstone Audio is a relatively new company that hit the ground running, entering the stomp-box arena with some innovative ideas that offer tone geeks unparalleled aural flexibility. The XD-1, for example, is essentially two amps in a box. It allows the user to generate the kind

    Walrus Audio’s Bellwether Dela

    The Bell Tolls For Thee

    The Bellwether from Walrus Audio is a high-end analog delay notable for its tone, adaptability, and depth of control. The pedal’s capabilities will exceed many players’ needs, but the Bellwether is well worth a look for any musician with the desire (and the pocket change) for a delay effect that answers more serious demands. None