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    Charlie Starr Riffs on the Grateful Dead!

    Check out Charlie Starr ripping on the Grateful Dead’s “Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodeloo.” He’s playing his ’62 Les Paul Junior through a 1960 Gibson GA-5T Skylark and an Echoplex. Read the Vintage Guitar mag review of Blackberry Smoke’s collaboration with Bob Weir, “An Evening at Tri,” in the July issue “Hit List” reviews. READ NOW!!


    Tommy Emmanuel Plays “The Mystery”

    Watch Tommy Emmanuel play “The Mystery” and read John Heidt’s review of his latest album, “Music Gone Public,” in the July issue of Vintage Guitar magazine. READ IT NOW!!


    Coco Montoya

    Hard Truth

    It’s been awhile since Coco Montoya’s last studio effort, but he comes out firing here. From the Albert King-style blast that kicks off the opener, “Before The Bullets Fly,” to the loud, raucous blues rock of the closer, “Truth Be Told,” He is spot on. The tunes here cover a lot of ground. “I Want

    Mary Kaye

    Beyond the Stratocaster Connection

    Most informed guitar enthusiasts associate veteran “lounge” guitarist Mary Kaye with the unique ’50s Fender Stratocaster model (blond finish, gold hardware) that has assumed her proper name as its designation. However, it’s ironic that she never owned a “Mary Kaye” Strat in the time that she brandished one in publicity photos of the Mary Kaye

    Teisco Del Rey Basses

    ’60s Egalitarianism from Japan

    Teisco Del Rey basses from the 1960s are exemplary of the Japanese-made instruments that swept into the American market like a tsunami during the “guitar boom” – and were the primary contributor to the demise of America’s budget-guitar industry. Which means, of course, that an untold number of American teenagers played instruments like these. During

    Robby Krieger

    New Musical Directions

    For all of his decades of noteworthy guitar work, Robby Krieger isn’t resting on his laurels. In 2002, Krieger and Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek formed Doors of the 21st Century (and they still perform as Manzarek-Krieger), but the guitarist’s newest album, Singularity, is an ambitious instrumental effort that expands on his desire to create music

    Vintage Instruments and the Ban on Ivory Trade

    Vintage Instruments and the Ban on Ivory Trade

    A presidential executive order issued February 11 proposes a wide ban on trade in ivory has widespread implications for trade in vintage musical instruments as well as antique art, furniture, firearms, swords, knives, and jewelry. U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has been tasked with writing and enforcing new regulations for import, export, and domestic trade

    California Guitar Trio

    Komorebi

    The CGT has been making music for 25 years and is celebrating with this wonderful, back-to-basics recording. Guitarists Paul Richards, Bert Lams, and Hideyo Moriya cut the record au natural with no effects and minimal compression – just microphones and new acoustics made by Kraut, Somogyi, and Breedlove. The set kicks off with Moriya’s sweetly

    Strymon Flint Tremolo and Reverb

    Our Man Flint

    Strymon Flint Tremolo & Reverb Price: $200 Info: www.strymon.net. In just a few short years, Strymon has established itself as a premier developer of pedal effects. With boxes like the highly praised El Capistan dTape Echo, they’ve cut out a niche building DSP effects that recapture the sounds of iconic analog gear with remarkable authenticity.

    Beyond the Parlor Part Three: Women

    Beyond the Parlor

    Part Three: Women

    Ed. Note: In the final installment in his series on the guitar in 19-century America, Tim Brookes offers a study of several women who played the guitar, and what the instrument meant to them. The first two parts are at Part One: The Guitar in Non-Anglo America and Part Two: Man and Machine. “The guitar before 1850 was a

    The National Silvo Electric Hawaiian

    One of the most innovative companies of the pre-World-War-II era, National found out quickly that innovation was a double-edged sword. Just as their resonator guitars of the late 1920s made the acoustic Hawaiian guitars of Hermann Weissenborn obsolete, electric guitars of the mid 1930s – some of them made of National’s own making – threatened

    1939 Gibson Super 400 Premier

    The Gibson Super 400 debuted in 1935 as the first production-model 18″ archtop guitar with f-shaped sound holes; 30 years prior, the company’s Style O was the same size and same shape, but had an oval sound hole. Throughout the swing/big-band era beginning in the mid ’30s, the Super 400 was the epitome of an

    Tinsley Ellis

    Screaming On The Inside

    “Red clay is what you see here in Georgia,” says Tinsley Ellis of the inspiration behind his new album, Red Clay Soul. “That’s what the ground looks like. I wanted an album that depicted the sound, look, and feel of the region.” Saturated with that ambiance, the disc brings together Ellis’ signature heart-crushing lyrics, stinging

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    Gibson EDS-1275 and EMS-1235

    It’s hard not to associate doubleneck electric guitars with images of Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page or fusion guru Mahavishnu John McLaughlin in the ’70s; however, the fact is that by the time the Big Js were stopping shows with these multi-headed beasts, they were already relics of the past. Doubleneck Spanish guitars got their first

    The Yosco No. 2

    Tenor Banjo

    The banjo and American music cross paths in a remarkably entangled web of complexity. The banjo was brought to the New World – conceptually, at least – by African slaves who used it to create music subsequently appropriated by 19th-century white entertainers, who created blackface minstrelsy, which became the basis of Vaudeville and a great

    Ampeg’s Jet Reverb Prototype

    Ampeg is frequently credited for being not only one of the first makers to put reverb in its amplifiers, but also for producing what was one of the consistently best-sounding reverbs of the 1960s. If we accept that the Ampeg reverb circuit is a noteworthy stop on any tour of tube-amp history, this is one

    Guild Basses in the Early 1980s

    Traditional, Temporary

    Guild Basses in the Early 1980s

    The early ’80s were a unique time in the history of American electric guitars. Fender and Gibson were both owned by corporate interests – the former CBS, the latter the Norlin conglomerate – and both suffered product offerings that had quality issues and/or uninspiring designs. Guild, on the other hand, was still battling the (unfair)

    Peavey RJ-IV

    Peavey RJ-IV bass, serial number 04938996. Photo: Bill Ingalls Jr. Instrument courtesy of Naffaz Skota. Americans by the millions “know” Randy Jackson. But not many realize that his gig as one of three judges on TV’s “American Idol” is just the tip of the iceberg in his long musical career. The veteran bassist has played

    Nancy Wilson

    Fire in the Heart

    In the early ’70s, women didn’t play rock guitar. Nor did they front bands. Nancy Wilson was an exception. Few guitarists present as memorable an onstage image as does Wilson brandishing her famous custom-color Fender Telecaster onstage with Heart, the band she co-founded with her sister, Ann, in 1974. One of the biggest bands of

    Awesome Musical Instruments T3 Pickup Switch Upgrade

    Wicked Switch

    Awesome Musical Instruments T3 Pickup Switch Upgrade Price: $149.99 (black or white three-ply); $164.99 (white pearloid); $169.99 (brown tortoiseshell) Info: www.awesome-guitars.com. When Leo Fender was designing the Strat back in the early ’50s, he equipped it with a surplus three-way pickup selector. Three pickups, three choices – simple and straightforward. Players ever since have tried to