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Guild’s S-100/S-200 “Kickstand” Models

Guild S-100 Polara (left) and Guild S-200 Thunderbird. Guild S-200: Hans Moust. Guild S-100: William Ritter. Instrument courtesy of George Gruhn. Much like several other well-known manufacturers, Guild has, through the years, changed ownership, locations, and identities. Guild was founded in 1952 by Alfred Dronge, a teacher and music-store owner in New York, and many of his first employees were former Epiphone workers hired after that company...

Guild Aristocrat M-75

...ct that Epiphone had fallen on hard times, and production had been moved to a Conn facility in Philadelphia. When Epi’s key production employees refused to move, Albert Dronge seized the opportunity and staffed his new Guild company with experienced ex-Epiphone workers, so Guild was well-equipped to make a Les Paul-like guitar. Guild debuted in ’53 with a full line of traditional hollowbody models, electric and acoustic. That year,...

Guild F-512

...tacked neck heel, Carlo Greco built a number of necks for Guild classical Mark VI and Mark VII guitars using this same construction and design, and may also have experimented with the concept on a few flat-tops. According to Guild expert Hans Moust, author of The Guild Guitar Book: The Company and the Instruments, 1952-1977, the stacked heel was “an effort to make more efficient use of the wood necessary to make a neck.” Moust notes that stacked...

Guild Liberator Elite

...s almost too beautiful to play. It’s just enough to sit there and admire it, not risking a ding. A good case in point is this drop-dead gorgeous 1988 Guild Liberator Elite, one of the last guitars to be produced before Guild got out of the solidbody electric game in the late 1980s. Guild guitars, founded in 1952 amidst the implosion of Epiphone, had been a player in the solidbody game since 1963, though never with overwhelming success. A...

1988 Guild Liberator Elite

...s almost too beautiful to play. It’s just enough to sit there and admire it, not risking a ding. A good case in point is this drop-dead gorgeous 1988 Guild Liberator Elite, one of the last guitars to be produced before Guild got out of the solidbody electric game in the late 1980s. Guild guitars, founded in 1952 amidst the implosion of Epiphone, had been a player in the solidbody game since 1963, though never with overwhelming success. A...
Guild Basses in the Early 1980s

Traditional, Temporary

...ass sounded “…a lot like a (Music Man) Sting Ray, only a little bit darker, because of the mahogany body.” Like almost all Guild basses, these were well-made and durable, and are probably undervalued in the vintage market. A Guild SB-202 with transitional pickup placement. Guild SB-202: Mike Ramos. This article originally appeared in VG October 2015 issue. All copyrights are by the author and Vintage Guitar magazine. Unauthorized replication or...

guild_s100_s200_01

Guild’s S-100/S-200 “Kickstand” Models

Joe Negri

...90s. At the time, Fender’s Guild line was handled by Bob Benedetto. “Teachers all got a Guild Manhattan, up through (guitar chairman) Bill Purse,” Joe recalls. “From the Manhattan, we went up a notch and I ended up getting a Guild Artist Award (renamed the Guild Benedetto Signature model).” Dissatisfied with the instrument, he discussed its drawbacks when Benedetto visited Duquesne. In the ’60s with pianist Johnny Costa and repaired New Yorker....

Guild Standard Series Acoustics

...tic guitars. The brand’s profile as an acoustic builder was certainly given a you-can’t-put-a-price-on-that bit of exposure when Richie Havens hammered on a D-40 in front of 400,000 people at Woodstock! Another unforgettable Guild gig was Stevie Ray Vaughan ripping through “Rude Mood” while playing a JF-65-12 (that’s right, a 12-string!) on an early episode of MTV’s “Unplugged.” Guild hopes to continue that legacy with its new Standard Series –...
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