Quantcast
Search

guild - search results

If you're not happy with the results, please do another search

Guild S-200 Thunderbird

...o trust this little stand with your guitar is another matter! Before 1964, Guild guitars had a headstock design that was very similar to Gibson’s open-book shape. That year, Guild switched to a new center-humped shape for its acoustics and archtops, and at some unknown point close to this, Guild ditched the Florentine head for the new standard shape seen here, possibly as early as ’64. We have to be a little vague here because Guild never bothered...

The Guild Factory 2007

...in the ’50s and ’60s. Installing frets. “The whole focus of our efforts at Guild are to return to our roots,” says Guild marketing manager Donnie Wade. “All specifications on our current production guitars are as much as possible like the late ’50s. Guild flat-tops now have red spruce tops and braces, and although we use CNC machines to do the initial neck carving, all final shaping and finishing is done by hand.” Wade adds that revamping Guild ha...

Guild’s S-100/S-200 “Kickstand” Models

Guild S-100 Polara (left) and Guild S-200 Thunderbird. Guild S-200: Hans Moust. Guild S-100: William Ritter. Instrument courtesy of George Gruhn. Much like several other well-known manufacturers, Guild has, through the years, changed ownership, locations, and identities. Guild was founded in 1952 by Alfred Dronge, a teacher and music-store owner in New York, and many of his first employees were former Epiphone workers hired after that company mov...
1985 Guild Nightbird Prototype Home Main Big

1985 Guild Nightbird Prototype

...Photo: Kelsey Vaughn/Gruhn Guitars. In early 1984, Mark Dronge, son of the Guild founder Alfred Dronge, was president of Guild. That year, Mark and I struck a deal to design six acoustic Guild guitars in two different body sizes. These were introduced at the 1984 summer National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) show in Chicago. Reaction to the acoustics was good, so I had little difficulty persuading Mark to let me design an electric guitar i...

Guild Aristocrat M-75

...the Les Paul. With the solidbody electric guitar still in its infancy and Guild being based in New York City, it’s likely that Guild founder Alfred Dronge paid little attention to the new solidbodies made in the hinterlands of Kalamazoo, Michigan, much less the crude “plank” solidbodies coming from Leo Fender’s upstart operation in California. However, when the Brooklyn-based Gretsch answered the Les Paul Model with a similar-looking Duo-Jet in ’...

Guild F-512

...y also have experimented with the concept on a few flat-tops. According to Guild expert Hans Moust, author of The Guild Guitar Book: The Company and the Instruments, 1952-1977, the stacked heel was “an effort to make more efficient use of the wood necessary to make a neck.” Moust notes that stacked heels were used on other F-512 (and F-50) models of the same period, but the practice of building the heel from various blocks was not continued. Ameri...

1988 Guild Liberator Elite

...1988 Guild Liberator Elite, one of the last guitars to be produced before Guild got out of the solidbody electric game in the late 1980s. Guild guitars, founded in 1952 amidst the implosion of Epiphone, had been a player in the solidbody game since 1963, though never with overwhelming success. A few Guild electrics, such as the Gumby-shaped Thunderbird and S-100 “Oak Leaf” (plus the thinline Starfires), acquired a sort of classic status, but neve...

Guild’s S-200 T-Bird

...oblong plate activate – surprise – the neck and bridge pickups. The larger Guild-brand Volume and Tone top hats serve Mode 2. Guild thoughtfully provides a manual with detailed diagrams explaining the various switching options. They even printed the names of the various controls on the removable clear plastic film that covers the pickguard, a most welcome feature for those of us who are a bit challenged in this area. Guitarists should spend time g...

John Oates’ Prized Guild F-30

...e late ’20s, and a Guild F-30 that accompanied Hurt through his prime. MJH Guild F-30: Philip Murphy. The ’64 Guild F-30 seen for years in the able hands of Piedmont-blues master Mississippi John Hurt. Hurt got the F-30 in 1964, when organizers of the Newport Folk Festival took him shopping in Greenwich Village. How did you come to roots music? I began playing guitar in the early ’60s; by age 11 or 12 I’d been playing for six years, doing rock and...

Guild Bluesbird

Price: $999.99 Info: www.guildguitars.com The Guild Bluesbird has a long history that began in the 1950s with Guild’s answer to the Gibson Les Paul –the M-75 Aristocrat, later renamed the M-75 Bluesbird. The guitar appeared in the Guild catalog for years before it was discontinued in the 1970s. It remained off the radar until the mid-1990s, when Guild reissued it with changes to the body shape and certain appointments. Then it disappeared again –...
Close [x]