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Seks Bomba – Somewhere In This Town

 
Somewhere In This Town

This is one of the most fun, most clever, and downright best CDs I’ve heard in a long time. I can’t even begin to describe what this Boston band does. Let’s say you took a big pan and threw in the Ventures, Burt Bacharach, Antonio Carlos Jobim, any number of late-’60s East and West Coast rock bands, and maybe a little Tom Jones, and you’ve only begun to explain what’s on this disc.

Describing some of the cuts… How about a pop instrumental with surf guitar, a quote from “Day Tripper,” and some trippy beatnik flute (“Bomba Au Go Go”). Then there’s the jazz-meets-blues-in-a-honky-tonk of “Happy Hour” with a swingin’ vocal and guitar solo. The title cut is a pop tune of sorts. Gorgeous changes, killer singing, and an arpeggiated solo that breaks into single-line rock. In a slightly off-kilter radio world, this would be number one on all charts next week.

“Love Me Pts. 1 &2″ is a crazy late-’60s-style rocker mixed with a funny spoken middle that competes with some wah guitar, nasty organ, and a pumping rhythm section. “Casino Royale” sounds like Booker T. and the M.G.s mixing classical music with their normal sound. “Fresh Perked” is just what the title says; an instrumental with jazzy swing and country-styled guitars. And topping it off is an on-target cover of Jobim’s “Agua De Beber” that’s to kill for.

George Hall produces the band, plays guitar, and sings some. Chris Cote also sings and plays guitar. Lori Perkins handles flute and organ. Brett Campbell is the drummer, and Matt Silbert is the bassist. I don’t usually mention all the players in a band in my reviews, but felt I should here. This band has such a unique and fresh outlook that I want to share them with everyone. This CD is as good and original as any major or minor label release I’ve heard in a long time. Please, for your own good, check them out. Fans of good playing, cool melodies, and off-the-wall behavior will love this.



This article originally appeared in VG‘s May ’02 issue. All copyrights are by the author and Vintage Guitar magazine. Unauthorized replication or use is strictly prohibited.

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