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Mosrite Stereo 350

...company and the new owners didn’t know about them. Unbeknownst to Semie, he’d signed over everything to Ross as collateral – including his brand name – and it was claimed by the new Kustom owners when Moseley couldn’t pay their note. Moseley moved back to California and tried to start again. By ’81 he’d managed to get his brand name back due to non-use, and headed to Jonas Ridge, North Carolina, where he...

Bill Gruggett

...overs may also note that some of the hardware on Stradette models may look familiar. According to Gruggett, a local metalworking company, Metaltec, had been supplying the Mosrite company with parts, such as bridges. And when Semie Moseley opted to change suppliers, Gruggett bought some of the remaining parts from the Bakersfield company (which is still in business, by the way). Moreover, the vibratos on some Stradettes were originally Standel...

Bill Gruggett

...overs may also note that some of the hardware on Stradette models may look familiar. According to Gruggett, a local metalworking company, Metaltec, had been supplying the Mosrite company with parts, such as bridges. And when Semie Moseley opted to change suppliers, Gruggett bought some of the remaining parts from the Bakersfield company (which is still in business, by the way). Moreover, the vibratos on some Stradettes were originally Standel...

January 2008

...h charts the adventures of Nat Daniel as he rode the electric guitar boom of the 1950s and ’60s to fame and fortune. By Eric C. Shoaf MOSRITE STEREO 350 If it hadn’t been for his serendipitous relationship with The Ventures, Semie Moseley might be just another obscure guitarmaker we’d scramble to identify. And we might not know anything about this circa 1971 Mosrite Stereo 350. By Michael Wright BASS SPACE The Gibson EB-3 Fender’s two-pickup...

February 2007

...made by ESP, Robin’s Ranger series instruments had reverse headstocks, Fender-like control plates, and large pickguards. Its 32″ scale and retro-cool vibe made it stand out. By Willie G. Moseley THE DIFFERENT STRUMMER Semie Moseley: The Lost Interview, Part 2 Semie meets the Ventures, discusses his record label and how he fielded offers to buy his company, then contemplates what might have been if he’d accepted. By Michael Wright...

March 2007

...to it was akin to “big deal,” some of Gibson’s innovations in the early 1970s had merit. And if you wanted to play a long-scale Gibson SG-shaped bass, it was the only game in town! By Willie G. Moseley THE DIFFERENT STRUMMER Semie Moseley: The Lost Interview, Part Three We conclude our exclusive series of transcriptions with never-before-told tales from the 1970s that find Semie down in spirit, but planning one more run at the brass ring. By...

Univox Hi Flyer

...endition of Johnny Smith’s “Walk Don’t Run.” At the height of their popularity, they helped create one of the decade’s more memorable guitars – the Mosrite Ventures model designed by Semie Moseley. Legend has it that when the Ventures approached Moseley about a special model, they wanted something like a Strat, so Semie flipped over a Fender and traced a reverse body. Of course he added other notable touches,...

The Acoustic

...acturing. The Acoustic Black Widows were particularly interesting because they really went in the face of trends of the times. Black Widows were likely designed in the U.S., but the majority were built in Japan (though Semie Moseley said he built the final 200). The Black Widow shown here is Japanese, and I have personally held a Black Widow guitar with slightly different features and a feel that is unmistakably Mosrite. What made these so...

January 2007

...EB-0 debuted in 1959 with a double-cutaway body and a silhouette inspired by second-generation Les Paul Juniors. In the mid 1970s, Kiss’ Gene Simmons may well have played this one. By Willie G. Moseley THE DIFFERENT STRUMMER Semie Moseley: The Lost Interview, Part One From a 1981 interview that has never been published, the hugely influential guitar builer provides fascinating reminiscences about his early days, and some of his adventures in the...

The Acoustic

...acturing. The Acoustic Black Widows were particularly interesting because they really went in the face of trends of the times. Black Widows were likely designed in the U.S., but the majority were built in Japan (though Semie Moseley said he built the final 200). The Black Widow shown here is Japanese, and I have personally held a Black Widow guitar with slightly different features and a feel that is unmistakably Mosrite. What made these so...
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