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Mosrite Stereo 350

1971 Mosrite Stereo 350. Remember that line from the old song, “If it weren’t for bad luck, I’d have no luck at all…”? In some ways, it’s a summation of the life of Semie Moseley. In fact, if it hadn’t been for his serendipitous relationship with The Ventures, he might have been one of those obscure guitarmakers we have to scramble to identify. And we might not know anything about this circa 1971...

The Story of Nudie’s Mosrite Mandolin

Click to enlarge. Guitar photos by Alain Tomatis. Other photos courtesy Kosmo Cominos. In the mid 1970s, Kosmo Cominos and his wife, Kathy, collected things. From Randle knives to Wurlitzer bubble jukeboxes, high-end wristwatches to English shotguns, you name it. But whenever they’d hit the road to find stuff at antique stores, music stores, pawn shops, and flea markets, their favorite finds were celebrity-associated musical instruments. And...

Bill Gruggett

The agrarian area of California that includes such cities as Bakersfield and Tulare has a special significance to country music lovers and guitar lovers alike. The musical mystique, of course, involves legendary players such as Merle Haggard and Buck Owens, among others, while most of the guitar brands made in the Golden State’s agricultural belt have been on the periphery of interest in classic American-made instruments, possibly...

Bill Gruggett

The agrarian area of California that includes such cities as Bakersfield and Tulare has a special significance to country music lovers and guitar lovers alike. The musical mystique, of course, involves legendary players such as Merle Haggard and Buck Owens, among others, while most of the guitar brands made in the Golden State’s agricultural belt have been on the periphery of interest in classic American-made instruments, possibly...

January 2008

FEATURES IN DETAIL The 1958-’62 Gibson ES-335TD A true benchmark, the first semi-hollowbody was the result of inspiration derived from the willingness to listen to players while devising a guitar that resonated like a hollowbody while sustaining like a solidbody. By Ward Meeker EMMYLOU HARRIS One Beautiful Voice, a Cavalcade of Great Guitarists Her new box set includes standards as well as “orphans,” and documents the numerous superb guitarists...

February 2007

FEATURES ERIC CLAPTON AND J.J. CALE Blowin’ Down the Road… Despite appearing onstage together only twice (at shows 27 years apart), they‘ve been collaborating continuously since early 1970. Their new album, Road to Escondido, is their first together. By Dan Forte AMP-O-RAMA Marshall’s 1962 JTM45 Jim Marshall’s amps were ultimately ripped from the belly of the late-’50s Fender Bassman, and it‘s fascinating to examine the seemingly subtle...

March 2007

FEATURES KEITH URBAN Down-Under Über-Picker The super-talented artist not only writes hit songs, gathers accolades, and recently married a movie star, he’s also a straight-up hellacious guitar picker and gear lover of the highest order! By Zac Childs AMP-O-RAMA The Vox AC15 Designed by Dick Denney in 1957, the little Vox AC15 is appreciated by “tonehounds” for its sweet, juicy glories, and ability to hit its sonic sweet spot at volumes...

Univox Hi Flyer

The Ventures had a powerful impact on both the worlds of rock music and guitars, as reflected in this ca. 1973 Univox Hi Flyer (a.k.a Hi Flier). In the early 1960s, the Ventures set the bar for instrumental rock with hits such as their rendition of Johnny Smith’s “Walk Don’t Run.” At the height of their popularity, they helped create one of the decade’s more memorable guitars – the Mosrite Ventures model...

The Acoustic

In the late ’60s, when Domino guitars were fading away, tube amplifiers were out of vogue. Old technology, man! Cool bands played through solidstate amps that delivered lots of clean power with none of that awful tube distortion. Cool bands played through Standels and tuck-and-rolled Kustoms. Entire bands were run through a single 350-watt Mosrite monster. Coming out of the late-’60s affection for transistors was the Acoustic...

Acoustic Black Widow

In the late ’60s, when Domino guitars were fading away, tube amplifiers were out of vogue. Old technology, man! Cool bands played through solidstate amps that delivered lots of clean power with none of that awful tube distortion. Cool bands played through Standels and tuck-and-rolled Kustoms. Entire bands were run through a single 350-watt Mosrite monster. Coming out of the late-’60s affection for transistors was the Acoustic...
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Giveaway #165

Enter to win a set of Electro-Harmonix Pedals valued at $480! Slammi Plus - This polyphonic powerhouse flawlessly transposes your pitch in two different directions...
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