Inside the latest VG
Published monthly since 1986
172

April 2008

 

FEATURES

MICK TAYLOR
Shedding Light on the Genius
As young musicians in the U.K. began to channel American blues in the ’60s, guitarists emerged with names like Clapton, Beck, Green, and Page. These days, one name often tends to be forgotten… By P.J. Cotroneo

AMP-O-RAMA
The Fender 5E3 Deluxe
The details of its ubiquitous design is hardwired into every guitarist’s genetic memory. Still, it’s too delectable a morsel to resist nibbling. Plus a few pointers on modifying yours for more headroom. By Dave Hunter

GIBSON SUPER 400
When introduced in 1934, it seemed more appropriate for the opulent 1920s than the economically shell-shocked ’30s. But it became the archtop for players and industry leader for a new era of super-sized “jazz” or “orchestral” guitars. By George Gruhn and Walter Carter

ARLEN ROTH
Flourishing After Adversity
His recent spate of creativity would be impressive regardless. But in the context of the life-altering events that befell him in ’98, it’s a wonder he’s able to get out of bed every day – and testament to the human spirit. By Dan Forte

PIECES OF A PROTOTYPE
Secrets of a SoCal “Parts” Guitar
The story of a California family whose father brought home a box of parts from Fender’s plant in Fullerton. They heated up a soldering iron on the kitchen stove and started assembling a guitar on the kitchen table… By Willie G. Moseley

RICKENBACKER 481
It’s hard to imagine an instrument that has undergone more innovation through its modern history. And while some guitar innovations are wonderful and remarkable, others leave you scratching your head. One of the latter can be found on the 1975 Rickenbacker 481. By Michael Wright

IN DETAIL
Fender’s Telecaster Thinline
A two-in-one response to the trends that favored lighter, natural-finished instruments, the Thinline put a twist on the Fender company’s oldest (and still best-selling) model. By Ward Meeker

BASS SPACE
The Rickenbacker 4005
Rickenbacker has a tradition of doing things a bit differently. So it’s no surprise that in 1965 it melded a hollowbody electric guitar with a bass, possibly as a response to Gibson’s EB-2 and Epiphone’s Rivoli. By Willie G. Moseley

DEPARTMENTS

DEPARTMENTS
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News and Notes
Gibson merges with TC, Fender to Market Taylor, Gretsch and Martin anniversaries, In Memoriam, more!

Bob Brozman
World Instruments, World Music
By Willie G. Moseley

Classic Concerts
Bob Seger, April ’73
By Ken Settle

Jimmy Leslie
From the Bay to the Swamp and Back
By John Heidt

Ask Zac
By Zac Childs

Ted Greene Remembered
By Jim Carlton

Jim Heath
A Reverend
By Any Other Name By John Heidt

Carl Filipiak
Knack for Jimi
By John Heidt

COLUMNS

The (Way) Back Beat
Fab Gear, The Pre-Historic Age: 1950s Guitar Marketing in the U.K.
By Peter S. Kohman

Q&A With George Gruhn

Acousticville
Dream Recorders
By Steven Stone

“401K” Guitars
A Good Point?
By Gil Hembree

Fretprints
The Edge
By Wolf Marshall

TECH

Guitar Shop
Shop Essentials
By Tony Nobles

Dan’s Guitar Rx
Flotsam Fever
By Dan Erlewine

Talkin’ Amps With…
Billy Yates: Building a Killer Amp for Less Than $200
By David Jung

REVIEWS

The VG Hit List
SRV, Chuck Berry, Drive-By Truckers, Levon Helm, Marshall Tucker, The Fender Electric Guitar Book, more!

Check This Action
The Independent
By Dan Forte

Vintage Guitar Gear Reviews
Collings SoCo, Harmonic Capo

Gearin’ Up!
The latest cool new stuff!

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